Regulators Expect Doctors To Tell The Truth About Their Past – What If They Don’t? Part Three Of Three

Regulators expect doctors to tell the truth, but the realities are terrifying. Doctors are supposed to tell regulators about their past. But they don't and it is amazing what they get away with.

Regulators expect doctors to tell the truth, but the realities are terrifying.

Doctors are supposed to tell regulators about their past.
But they don’t and it is amazing what they get away with.
An 18-month investigation by the Toronto Star newspaper has discovered some harsh realities – doctors don’t always tell regulators what’s in their past.
And the most disturbing thing is what they don’t tell regulators can have serious consequences for their patients.
This is an issue we all should be concerned about.
The most serious problem is that the regulatory bodies governing doctor expect them to be honest, forthright and ethical.
And while most doctors are – many are not.
So what are some of the facts the Toronto Star has uncovered?
Here is but one example – Dr. Martin Tesher.
Last year the U.S. Drug Enforcement Administration arrested him for allegedly illegally giving people oxycodone.
In  a DEA statement they referred to Tesher as a “a multimillion dollar heroin ring, distributing more than $20 million worth of opioids.”
And the extent of how much doctors lie is pretty widespread:
“Three studies examining doctor dishonesty — summarized in a 2001 Western Journal of Medicine article — reported between 19 per cent and 31 per cent of physicians had falsified credentials on residency and fellowship applications.

Another study on the credentialing process of physicians in U.S. hospitals found more than 15 per cent of physicians failed to include information negative to their own situations “suggesting that either the physicians remembered imperfectly or they may have been shading their records,” a study concluded as reported by the Toronto Star.

And here is the final report by the Toronto Star and some of the shocking lies doctors get away with, even while regulators expect doctors to tell the truth.


This post is part three of three.
read part one
read part two


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